The trip from Magadan, Siberia, to Grand Rapids, Michigan, seemed to take forever. In actuality it took 30 hours, four stops, three different airplanes, and one border entry.

After a while, I was tired of the journey. The seat became uncomfortable. The drone of the engines was distracting. The airports all started to look alike. What helped me to endure it was focusing on the end of the trip—my arrival home.

Yet my journey across nine time zones was nothing compared with travel in the 1800s. Back then, it took several days to go from New York to Philadelphia. The voyage from England to the Far East took many weeks.

The journey to spiritual maturity is also a long one, but it’s no faster today than it was in the first century. No new technology can shorten the trip. It’s easy to grow impatient. When the way is difficult and dangerous, we tire. It seems as if there is no rest for our weary souls.

That’s why we must be like Abraham, who focused on the promised destination (Heb. 11:8-10). We need to keep our spiritual eyes on the “heavenly country” that awaits us (v.16), and our Lord who has gone before us (12:2). When we remember where we are going and that Christ awaits us, we can endure anything along the way.